Waiting

I wait and wait without an end in sight.
I pull and want with all my might.
But I’m just tired of the fight,
And no longer know what’s right.

Should I stay or should I go
I cannot tell, nor do I know.
‘Accept it and just ride the flow’
It’s not an option… it’s a blow.

In the end I might be running
But I hope I may be learning,
That some flames will not be burning
No matter how strong the yearning.

I’ll be crushed then I’ll be set
You’ll be my greatest regret.
My only hope is to forget
The day we so easily met.

I tell myself to stay and try
To not give in and say goodbye.
The target though was set so high
That it seem like it’s a lie.

I wait and wait without an end in sight.
I pull and want with all my might.
But I’m so tired of the fight,
I no longer know what’s right.

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Inner Demons

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I’m building walls they have to climb,
Push them away time after time.
They mock and laugh, and then hit back
And easily get back on track.

I’m building walls they have to climb,
Push them away time after time.
They gently brush away my hair
I take a breath but there’s no air.

I’m building walls they have to climb,
Push them away time after time.
I shake them off just for an instant
They grab on tight, they are resistant.

I’m building walls they have to climb,
Push them away time after time.
I choose to face them feeling stronger,
They smile back and hold me longer.

I’m building walls they have to climb,
Push them away time after time.
I’m giving up and slowly fade
Give in, find solace in their shade.

I’m building walls they have to climb,
Push them away time after time.
The demons offer their embrace
I just give in and take my place.

They find me when I’m all alone
And cut me down to the bone.
I’m slowly learning how to die
My silenced eyes no longer cry.

© Copyright 2018 Olivia G. Owens. All rights reserved.

Dreams of Death – by Jeff Prior

 

Dreams of death are nothing new,
I’ve had those dreams, you’ve had them too.
Sometimes death doesn’t sound so bad,
It can’t be worse than the day I’ve had.
A stain on my soul and a wound to my pride,
Sometimes I think I’m broken inside.
Troubled dreams and a restless night,
Another day, another pointless fight.

Dreams of death are nothing new,
I’ve had those dreams, I’ve lived them too.
Some days death strikes fear in my soul,
Everything ends, life takes its toll.
A pain in my heart and regrets in my head,
Do we still feel pain after we’re dead?
Troubled thoughts and a twisted dream,
Another day, another torn seam.

Dreams of death are nothing new,
I’ve had those dreams, I’ve denied them too.
Some things can’t be believed,
Some deaths are never grieved.
A lie on my lips and despair in my heart,
Is it too late for another fresh start?
Troubled past and a dark path ahead,
Another day, another toast to the dead.

Dreams of death are nothing new,
I’ve had those dreams, I’ve believed them too.
Some people think they’ll never die,
They live their life believing that lie.
A dream of tomorrow and a nightmare of yesterday,
Is there ever a winner in this game we play?
Troubled soul, and a dark cloud overhead,
Another day, another liar is dead.

© Copyright Jeff Prior. All rights reserved.

2014 in Review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

A San Francisco cable car holds 60 people. This blog was viewed about 1,200 times in 2014. If it were a cable car, it would take about 20 trips to carry that many people.

Click here to see the complete report.

How to Get Published in Literary Magazines and Journals via Writer’s Circle

Getting a piece of writing published online is easy — all you need is an Internet connection and there’s an endless amount of places to put your words. Getting a piece of writing published in a literary magazine or journal, however, is quite the opposite. So… why go through all the trouble?

Literary magazines and journals offer a big audience of readers — as well as agents, publishers, editors, and other people in the industry. Beyond that though, the submission process can be a really educational and rewarding experience for writers. It’s a challenge that you work toward, and if you get rejected you’ll learn from it — and if you get accepted, you’ll feel quite accomplished.
If you want that feeling of accomplishment (and to be able to throw it in your portfolio), check out some of these tips for getting noticed and published by magazines and journals.
  • Find a publication that matches your type of writing.

    This is excellent advice from Poets & Writers, which cautions that writers should research magazines and journals before submitting any work to them. See what kind of tone, length, voice, and topics are in the publication currently — do these seem to be a match for your style of writing? Could you write something to match these things? Would you want to read this publication regularly? Ask yourself these questions before submitting.

  • Craft something that you absolutely love.

    Though you want to follow the first step here and research where you’re submitting, you don’t want to craft something that you don’t absolutely love. Because magazines and journals are often read by agents and publishers, you want the work to be a good representation of what you’re about — something you’re very proud of. Seems like a no brainer, but it’s a top piece of advice from The Write Practice.

  • Read the rules and guidelines carefully.

    Not following the rules and guidelines for submissions is a quick way to get tossed out of the running. Themes, word limits, genres they don’t want, deadlines — some even specify exactly how they want the submission arranged and what extra info they want from you. You want to be noticed — but not for ignoring the rules that magazines clearly post.

  • Make connections and self-promote — without being over the top.

    Always good for a writer to network, but one important reason is because you might get your foot in the door with someone who works at a literary magazine or journal. You don’t, however, want to be too persistent with these leads, as Cosmopsis explains — you don’t want to nag or bother someone too much, so create personal relationships with people in the industry and then talk business.

  • Don’t ignore non-paying gigs.

    Obviously getting published and making money is ideal, but don’t ignore magazines and journals that don’t pay. It could be a good way to test the waters and grow your portfolio.

  • Read, re-read, and re-read again before sending something in.

    Remember — you don’t get a chance to defend your piece in person, so edit it carefully for grammatical mistakes and typos. Also, read it aloud and make sure that it makes sense and is very clear for the reader. Work out awkward sentence structure and holes in the story before you send the finished product — if something doesn’t make sense to you, it probably won’t make sense to an editor at a magazine.

  • Don’t ignore rejections.

    If you get a rejection letter, don’t toss it aside — instead, follow The Review Review‘s tip and take it as a good sign. If an editor actually takes the time to offer feedback and comment on your work, that person probably liked it — start a conversation and ask if you can send a revision, send something else, or get clarity on the feedback. The editor might start a dialogue, which is a great way to start a relationship with the magazine and get really helpful feedback on your work for next time.

Keep these tips in mind while writing and submitting work to magazines and journals, and you could find yourself published — and that offers a whole different set of opportunities as a writer.
  • Find a publication that matches your type of writing.

    This is excellent advice from Poets & Writers, which cautions that writers should research magazines and journals before submitting any work to them. See what kind of tone, length, voice, and topics are in the publication currently — do these seem to be a match for your style of writing? Could you write something to match these things? Would you want to read this publication regularly? Ask yourself these questions before submitting.

  • Craft something that you absolutely love.

    Though you want to follow the first step here and research where you’re submitting, you don’t want to craft something that you don’t absolutely love. Because magazines and journals are often read by agents and publishers, you want the work to be a good representation of what you’re about — something you’re very proud of. Seems like a no brainer, but it’s a top piece of advice from The Write Practice.

  • Read the rules and guidelines carefully.

    Not following the rules and guidelines for submissions is a quick way to get tossed out of the running. Themes, word limits, genres they don’t want, deadlines — some even specify exactly how they want the submission arranged and what extra info they want from you. You want to be noticed — but not for ignoring the rules that magazines clearly post.

  • Make connections and self-promote — without being over the top.

    Always good for a writer to network, but one important reason is because you might get your foot in the door with someone who works at a literary magazine or journal. You don’t, however, want to be too persistent with these leads, as Cosmopsis explains — you don’t want to nag or bother someone too much, so create personal relationships with people in the industry and then talk business.

  • Don’t ignore non-paying gigs.

    Obviously getting published and making money is ideal, but don’t ignore magazines and journals that don’t pay. It could be a good way to test the waters and grow your portfolio.

  • Read, re-read, and re-read again before sending something in.

    Remember — you don’t get a chance to defend your piece in person, so edit it carefully for grammatical mistakes and typos. Also, read it aloud and make sure that it makes sense and is very clear for the reader. Work out awkward sentence structure and holes in the story before you send the finished product — if something doesn’t make sense to you, it probably won’t make sense to an editor at a magazine.

  • Don’t ignore rejections.

    If you get a rejection letter, don’t toss it aside — instead, follow The Review Review‘s tip and take it as a good sign. If an editor actually takes the time to offer feedback and comment on your work, that person probably liked it — start a conversation and ask if you can send a revision, send something else, or get clarity on the feedback. The editor might start a dialogue, which is a great way to start a relationship with the magazine and get really helpful feedback on your work for next time.

Keep these tips in mind while writing and submitting work to magazines and journals, and you could find yourself published — and that offers a whole different set of opportunities as a writer.

Dear Mother…

A little poem I wrote for my mother on Mother’s Day…

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For nine months you carried me,
And all I did was make you pee.
On your bladder I sat and sat
Wishing I could make it flat.

Heartburn came along with me,
I didn’t listen to your plea.
I even made you nauseous too,
So much so that you turned blue.

To give me room, your belly grew
I know you felt like a big moo.
I gave you cankles but great skin,
You always had to fake a grin.

When you sat down you often prayed
That you wouldn’t need an aide
To help you off the floor again,
You hoped I wouldn’t cause a sprain.

And all the changes that I caused,
They never even made you pause.
One minute made you cry or bite,
Another, you wanted to kill on sight.

I made you eat some crazy things
Like ice cream with buffalo wings.
Apples, pickles, and green peas
All drowned in mustard with some cheese.

I even made your nights grow longer
And your days became much shorter.
I have however made love stronger,
You willingly became my anchor.

My teenage years were no fun
But you refused to say we’re done.
I was too silly to accept
Mothers are here to be kept.

Once again you’re by my side
Your eyes uncertain, gazing wide.
Your life is still all about me
Most likely ’til eternity.

My words unworthy and so few,
Cannot compare to what is true.
I am in awe of all your love,
That rivals all the stars above.

© Copyright 2014 Olivia G. Owens. All rights reserved.

Beautiful Friend

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This poem is dedicated to my stepfather. This would not have been possible without you.

Here’s to you…

Hate will consume your life, they all say,
Hate is a burden that looks for a prey.
Darkness will slowly envelop your soul,
An easy rhythm of fear and control.

Hate is a burden far too great to bear,
A certainty more revealing than glare.
An incurable wound without any bounds,
As wretched and tragic a word as it sounds.

My hatred’s alive, it keeps going strong.
Forgiveness is earned, forgetting is wrong.
It’s easy to hate you for all you have done.
Forgiving, forgetting feels just like a gun.

A gun to your head devoid of all favor;
Torment charged bullets that only I savor.
A gun that shoots constant horror and pain,
Two gifts from me – your woe keeps me sane.

Hatred of you makes me happy, fulfilled,
Makes me work harder for the life that I’ve built.
A life full of love, endurance, and joy,
Something you want that you’ll only destroy.

It’s easy to hate, you’ve infected my life,
Unbearable cuts you made like a knife.
I am not ashamed and I’ll scream ’til the end,
My hatred of you – a beautiful friend.

© Copyright 2014 Olivia G. Owens. All rights reserved.

 

Photo courtesy of: http://creattica.com/